Latest News

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The Government has taken action to reduce the potential costs to employers of last month's decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal in Bear Scotland Ltd. v Fulton that holiday pay should reflect non-guaranteed overtime that is routinely worked. The ...
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The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has upheld an earlier ruling of the Advocate General on a question raised by the Danish District Court in holding that severe obesity can be considered a disability under EU law. The issue arose in the case...
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The changes to the 'deemed occupation' period for the granting of private residence relief (PRR) have been well reported and apply to exchanges of contracts on residential properties after 5 April 2014. The changes are relevant where the property has not...
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In a case which illustrates the magnitude of the task faced by Employment Tribunals in resolving the most factually complex cases, a black professor who claimed to be the victim of a 'conscious conspiracy emanating from the very top' at the university where...
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The High Court has ruled that fees for the use of Employment Tribunals (ETs) and the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) are lawful. The fees were first introduced by the Government in July 2013. Since then, the number of cases coming before ETs and the EAT...
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The Legal Ombudsman has published a report calling for the introduction of tougher controls on those who charge for writing wills. Last year, the Ombudsman received more than 1,000 complaints relating to the drafting of wills and the provision of probate...
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The Central London residential property market is known to have risen to dizzying heights over the last few years, which has led to the victory by residents of a prestige mansion block in their five-year struggle to acquire the building's freehold proving to...
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It is fairly widely known that in a legal dispute some documents can be 'privileged', which means that they cannot be used in evidence. Normally, communications between a solicitor and their client are privileged. However, the right of privilege is not...
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In a crucial victory for consumers, the Supreme Court has ruled that a householder who entered into a removals contract with a tradesman who visited his home was entitled both to change his mind and to reclaim his £1,000 deposit. The man had...
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When an informal conversation over dinner in a restaurant that included a proposed agreement between a divorcing couple did not lead to a settlement, the court was faced with a decision as to whether matters discussed during the conversation could...